Recruitment 2020: Why Delta Chi

“I have found my life long best friends. Without Delta Chi, I wouldn’t have grown into the stronger version of myself that I am now. Delta Chi has been one of the best possible things to happen to me. Without these amazing, powerful girls I wouldn’t have stepped out of my comfort zone and I wouldn’t be the best version of myself that I am now”

Summer Sant Amour, Rays Pledge Class ’19

“I was voted least likely to join a sorority in high school and didn’t decide to rush until the very last minute. Without D Chi, I probably never would have crossed paths with the girls that have been my strongest support system this year.”

Ben Benoit, Rays Pledge Class ’19

I rushed Delta Chi because during informal rush, I heard other groups say “I knew I wanted to be here because I wanted to be like these girls” and that’s when it clicked. I knew I wanted to be like a Delta Chi girl. They are all quirky, outgoing, positive, hilarious, generous, accepting people. I knew they would bring out all these qualities within myself that I’d been too scared to share with other people. I am so happy to be a part of a group who’s allowed me to be the person I’ve always wanted to be, and feel accepted nonetheless.

Lauren Amelia, Sapphires Pledge Class ’17

“My favorite part of being a Delta Chi is knowing that I will never be alone. If you ever reach out for help there will always be at LEAST one girl that is willing to be by your side for as long as you need!”

Bella Koutsopanagos, Comets Pledge Class ’18

“I love Delta Chi because I feel like it truly is a home away from home.”

Lindsey Sykora, Comets Pledge Class ’18

“From seniors to freshman to graduates, everyone is so close and I can honestly say I love every single one of them. Becoming a Delta Chi changed my college experience, and I am forever grateful.”

Alivia Ranieri, Comets Pledge Class ’18

“I love Delta Chi because these girls are my best friends. From sleepovers, to dinners in the CSL, to running into them on the way to class, these girls have become the best parts of Augustana for me. I know that I am in something that is bigger than myself and I have made friends (and sisters) that will last a lifetime.”

Sarah Schwarm, Rays Pledge Class ’19

“I love Delta Chi Theta because it is a group of women that I am proud to be associated with. Rushing turned my three best friends and I into sisters, and pledging gave us over thirty close friends that we know we can rely on. I have met older girls who quickly became my role models because of their enthusiasm, involvement, and ability to have genuine fun.”

Madi Filippi, Rays Pledge Class ’19

“You get to meet so many people and begin involving yourself in so many different clubs and friend groups because of the diversity Delta Chi has among its members.”

Sydney Ion, Comets Pledge Class ’19

“I love Delta Chi because of the nonstop smiles that are created whenever I am with my sisters. No matter what we are doing, I am constantly laughing when I’m around them. You know that blissful, happy feeling that you get when you literally don’t think life could get any better? They give me that feeling.”

Maddie Nelson, Sapphires Pledge Class ’17

“The amount of new experiences, opportunities, and friendships that I have made within a year and a half has been the most fun, rewarding, and humbling experiences I have had here at Augie. The people and memories I have made through delta chi makes me realize that I have never felt more comfortable, confident, and loved by any other group of amazing women.

Sophie Ahlberg, Rays Pledge Class ’19

“I love Delta Chi because you can be yourself.”

Olivia Hagerty, Rays Pledge Class ’19

“I love how talented, intelligent, and inspiring the women of Delta Chi are. Everyone comes with different experiences and backgrounds and we are able to bond and form meaningful relationships with one another.”

Alo Ochoa, Rays Pledge Class ’19

“I didn’t have to put up a front or fake who I was for them to like me. I never reached that level of comfort with any other group, so I knew I had to become a Delta Chi.”

Jessica Miller, Rays Pledge Class ’19

“I love Delta Chi because no matter how close you are with someone there are always people there for you.”

Ashley Dehmlow, Rays Pledge Class ’19

“I love that Delta Chi is full of unique women that aren’t afraid to be themselves.”

Margaret Meer, Rays Pledge Class ’19

SEMIFORMAL 2019:

Meet our Executive Board, Fall Term 2019

PRESIDENT: Lauren Endress

Lauren is a student worker for the admissions office, was the co-chair of the late night committee with the OSL, and is in the Omicron Delta Kappa honor society. 
Lauren says: “I love delta chi because it is full of strong, honest, enthusiastic women who are unafraid to be their most genuine self!!! I love being surrounded by people who let themselves have fun and care so much about each other.”

VICE PRESIDENT: British Rhone

British is an ambassador in the office of admissions and a part of active minds.
British says: “I love delta chi bc they make me feel like I am loved. Each girl is empowering and they make sure that you are your best self. They support one another and will always have my back. I love them with all my heart!”

TREASURER: Kelli Johnson

Kelli is a Membership Chair in the Mortar Board chapter, an Admissions Ambassador, as well as a Becker CPA and WileyPlus ambassador on campus, and involved in active minds. 
Kelli says: “I love delta chi because every girl is so unique yet somehow I could be best friends with every personality in the group. I wouldn’t have imagined myself growing so close with many of my best friends today if it weren’t for delta chi, and that’s because each girl is so accepting and supportive. These girls are somehow able to be both the most wild and weird yet sweet and friendly people I have ever met, and they truly make Augie feel like home.”

It is time to bring the topic of mental illness into the open

 

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Written by Kristina MacDonald for the Augustana Observer 

No one really understands why you have to check seven different times if the bathroom light is turned off. There’s no handbook on what to do when you have a petrifying panic attack in the cereal aisle of Hy-Vee. You never asked to be so painfully depressed that you can’t make it out of bed to go to your best friend’s birthday party. You never wished for your mental illness, but you have it and it’s important that you address it so that it doesn’t consume you.

While not everyone’s mental illnesses are so paralyzing, they all deserve to be talked about. All are important and unique and should be treated as such. Mental illness is a sensitive topic and talking about it can leave many feeling uncomfortable, but we have to do it anyway. We have the ability to make another person’s life better, so let’s do it.

It can be very isolating to feel that no one understands what you’re going through. It’s not hard for those with mental illness to feel that way, given the way we think about mental health in our society.

Often, mentally ill people are depicted as “crazy.” In fact, the National Institute of Mental Health indicates that less than 1% of the American population has a psychotic disorder, which is usually what people mean by “crazy,” and even for them, the term is insulting.

Mentally ill people are often portrayed in film as dangerous when, in reality, mentally ill people are far more likely to be victims of violence than perpetrators. Mentally ill people are regarded as oddballs who stand out as strange, but really, nearly 18% of adults in the U.S. meet criteria for mental illness at any point, and most are diagnosed with mood disorders and anxiety disorders that could cause substantial suffering, but that suffering would be quite invisible to the rest of us.

Among young adults, mental illness has a higher prevalence. 30% of college students in the US report feeling depressed to the point that it affected their school performance. However, 50% of Americans with major depression do not seek help for their mental illness. And it is no surprise; when those with mental illness are not spoken about or portrayed as strange or dangerous, they are simply not spoken about at all.

Perhaps if mental illness were described as a common, sometimes chronic, but sometimes transient phenomenon, those suffering from it would feel validated and get the help they deserve. Talking about mental illness is not only crucial for those suffering from it, but for everyone. We all need to be self-aware about our mental health and understand the nature of our feelings.

Not everyone wants to share what their addiction, their eating disorder, or their PTSD has been like for them, and that’s fine. Your mental illness is incredibly personal and sharing it with people can make you feel vulnerable.

Not everyone is understanding and sympathetic. People do judge.

But you don’t have to talk specifically about your illness to start the conversation. Talking about the importance of general mental health will do important things. At the very least, it might make someone feel understood. Even if you don’t have a personal story of mental illness, you’re a big part of the conversation. Do some research, be a voice for those who may feel they don’t have one. Ask questions!

We have to let people know that they are not alone in their battles. We have to educate ourselves more about mental illnesses because they are so prevalent among our peers. And we have got to put an end to the erroneous idea that having a mental illness and being “crazy” are synonymous. They are not.

It merely means that some mental health symptoms you are experiencing are interfering with your functioning or causing you subjective distress. With treatment, there are millions of highly functioning people who have a mental illness.

Your professor. The guy that lives below you. Your aunt. Your friend. You. Me.

The point is that we have to stop fearing or ignoring people that suffer from these illnesses. If we do not, no one will talk about it. If no one talks about it, nobody gets better. So, let’s start this conversation.

Please don’t face your mental illness alone. Talk to your family, tell your friends, email your professor, call Augustana’s counseling services (309 794 7357) and make an appointment, it’s free! You’re not alone in your struggles and you should never be made to feel like you are.

Source:

MacDonald, Kristina . “It is time to bring the topic of mental illness into the open .” Augustana Observer [Rock Island] Mar. 2017: n. pag. Web.
http://www.augustanaobserver.com/2017/03/it-is-time-to-bring-the-topic-of-mental-illness-into-the-open/


Delta Chi Theta and the Mental Health Walk Awareness Committee would like to invite you to help raise awareness for mental health issues by walking for the cause on April 29th in PepsiCo. With your help we can end the stigma around mental health disorders and raise money to aid in decreasing these statistics. All money will go to NAMI (The National Alliance on Mental Illness)
SAVE THE DATE
When: Saturday April 29th
Where: PepsiCo Gym
Time: 2-4pm 
What: Helping end the stigma around mental health

while enjoying the fun, food, prizes, & mental health related activities!

 

There will also be a Chipotle Fundraiser for National Association of Mental Illness on Thursday April 20th from 5-9pm. All you have to do is go to the Moline Chipotle and tell them you are there for NAMI. %50 of your purchase will go straight to the cause!!!

 flyer.pdf

If you are not able to make the event, please consider donating to our GoFundMe Page: https://www.gofundme.com/augie-mental-health-awareness-walk
For Updates RSVP on our Facebook event page:
 

Or you can send checks to 1213 37th Street. Rock Island IL 61201 with the check made out to Delta Chi Theta. We will then write a lump sum check to the National Association of Mental Illness Organization after the Fundraiser event with %100 of the proceeds and donations.

The feet might hurt, but raising over $1,400 for Family Resources Safepath didn’t

One in 5 women and one in 16 men are sexually assaulted while in college. Rape is the most under-reported crime and 63% of sexual assaults are not reported to police. Sexual assaults happen every day causing women and men immense emotional and physical distress. These victims need outlets and ways of finding help.

The ladies of Delta Chi Theta Sorority and the men of Phi Omega Phi Fraternity held a fundraiser to raise funds for Safe Path as well as raise awareness on our campus last image1-3Saturday in PepsiCo. Through the help of the many participants from groups on campus, we held an event called “Are you MAN enough to walk in HER shoes?” This event ended up being very fun and helped raise money a lot of money. Along with the help of Phi Omega Phi and the participants, we raised over $1,400! Men and women from campus competed against each while wearing high heels in events such as the egg-spoon obstacle course, egg toss, musical chairs, 3-legged race, and a hula hoop contest. Each participant who placed in 3rd or above got points that added to their final score. With the final event ending in a neck and neck race with Allie Bettenhausen sprinting to pass Rahul Bhatia to place first in the obstacle course, you could say that the day was exciting! Kyle Zeberlein with 10 points took home first place in the event. But in reality, we took home first place because we ended the day knowing that we had raised money and awareness for sexual assault and Safepath.
A special thanks to all the participants! Thank you to Kyle Zeberlein, Rahul Bhatia, Andrew Hollis, Bennett Tomlin, Allie Bettenhausen, Maggie Williams, Bri Frys, Madison Stoneman, Rachel Cheval, Francesco Sposito, Keridwen Mcdaniel, Luke Robinson, Rebekah Wilken, Nicholas Steichmann, Noah-Christina Reed, Bethany Koch, Ella McCorkle, and Adam Metz for sacrificing your feet and your time to victims of sexual assault!

Information on Family Resources Safepath Organization:
The Quad Cities’ Family Resources Safepath Organization’s mission is to create a community free of violence through education, counseling, prevention, and advocacy. It is a local organization that deals with social services, advocacy, family restoration, and education.
Rape and domestic violence are crimes of violence motivated by a need to show power or to express anger against another person. Violence thrives on shame, secrecy, and silence. Thousands of people are served by SafePath Survivor Resources each year. If you or a loved one are ever in doubt, call us and we will help you through whatever you are experiencing.

If you have been raped or sexually assaulted, we are here for you.

After an assault, survivors may experience symptoms of Rape Trauma Syndrome, which include:

  • Flashbacks
  • Feelings of hopelessness
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Isolation
  • Nightmares and sleeplessness
  • Disturbing and repeated thoughts and memories

Such feelings are entirely natural. However, with time, care and guidance, survivors can move beyond these stages and begin to put their lives back together. The steps along this path are not easy. But through programs like SafePath Survivor Resources, survivors can get the help, assistance and support they need.

Lady Bug Love in the Workplace


015-delta-chi-thetaMy name is Amy Even and I’m a senior at Augie as well as a member of the Delta Chi Theta sorority. When I pledged Delta Chi in 2014, I expected to build long-lasting friendships and to find my home away from home. Three years later, I can say I have been blessed with just that. This loving and supportive group of women have supported me throughout my college experience and it used to break my heart to think about graduating. It was easy to be saddened by the thought of leaving this wonderful place and all of my sorority sisters, but this past summer completely changed my mentality.

I am an accounting and business management major. During the summer of 2016, I worked at Deloitte & Touche in the South Loop of Chicago as an audit intern. A few weeks before my internship began, I received an e-mail from Kierra Smith, a Delta Chi that was a senior when I was a freshman. It turns out that she worked at Deloitte and was assigned to be my “buddy” throughout my internship. I was ecstatic to discover that I knescreen-shot-2017-01-15-at-7-26-47-pmw someone within the company. Kierra and I met for lunch periodically throughout my internship to talk about how I was doing. She was honestly a godsend for me that summer because I had very little audit experience going into my internship. I asked her upwards of 400 questions throughout the duration of my internship and she was more than happy to give me advice and guide me in the right direction. I don’t know what I would have done without her kind and encouraging spirit leading me. I was so pleased to receive a full-time job offer at the end of the summer and I have no doubt in my mind that I have Kierra to thank.

I also had an amazing mentor at Deloitte that just so happened to be a Delta Chi as well! Courtney Kauffman is from the Diamond pledge class of Spring 2008 (Giraffe family) and graduated from Augustana in 2011. I will never forget the day that we met for lunch towards the end of my internship. We met at this cute little stir-fry place in the heart of Chicago. Having never met Courtney before and the fact that she was my mentor, I was expecting the lunch to be business-oriented and slightly more formal than a casual get-together. As soon as Courtney walked in, she came up to me and gave me a hug after gasping at my height (she’s closer to 5 feet tall whi13716000_10205168605049715_1100678592794587876_nle I’m almost 6 feet tall). We sat and talked for over an hour about rush, pledging, formals, semi-formals, you name it. After we got all of our sorority talk, Courtney asked me about my internship and gave me tons of advice on how to excel in my position. Once we left the restaurant, she hugged me again and told me to never hesitate to ask her for help. I was so grateful for her kind words and for making me feel like I was back at Augustana in an environment that was so new to me.

All in all, I learned that graduating doesn’t mean leaving Delta Chi. It means getting to grow professionally and one day sharing your experiences with someone who was in the same position as you were on the first day of your internship. I find so much comfort in knowing that there’s endless lady bug love waiting for me in the real world.

Written by Amy Even 

Walking in Heels for Sexual Assault Victims

Here’s the Problem:

One in 5 women and one in 16 men are sexually assaulted while in college. Rape is the most under-reported crime and 63% of sexual assaults are not reported to police. Sexual assaults happen every day causing women and men immense emotional and physical distress. These victims need outlets and ways of finding help.

Here’s the Solution:

The Quad Cities’ Family Resources Safepath Organization’s mission is to create a community free of violence through education, counseling, prevention, and advocacy. It is a local organization that deals with social services, advocacy, family restoration, and education.

Rape and domestic violence are crimes of violence motivated by a need to show power or to express anger against another person. Violence thrives on shame, secrecy, and silence. Thousands of people are served by SafePath Survivor Resources each year. If you or a loved one are ever in doubt, call us and we will help you through whatever you are experiencing.

If you have been raped or sexually assaulted, we are here for you.

After an assault, survivors may experience symptoms of Rape Trauma Syndrome, which include:

  • Flashbacks
  • Feelings of hopelessness
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Isolation
  • Nightmares and sleeplessness
  • Disturbing and repeated thoughts and memories

Such feelings are entirely natural. However, with time, care and guidance, survivors can move beyond these stages and begin to put their lives back together. The steps along this path are not easy. But through programs like SafePath Survivor Resources, survivors can get the help, assistance and support they need.

Here’s what WE are DOING:

The ladies of Delta Chi Theta Sorority and the men of Phi Omega Phi Fraternity are holding a fundraiser to raise funds for Safe Path as well as raise awareness on our campus. Through the help of the many participants from all aspects and groups on campus, we are holding an event called “Are you MAN enough to walk in HER shoes?” This event will be a humorous way to create awareness and raise money. Men and women will be competing in various activities and competitions while wearing heels on January 14th, 2017.

Here’s how YOU can join us in our mission:

DONATE. Do not be a bystander when you see a sexual assault happening or a situation that could turn into a possible sexual assault. Know what resources can help so you can give information out victims if need be.

And..

Come to our fundraiser on January 14th!

Thanks in advance for your help! You can make online contributions here:

https://www.piggybackr.com/delta_chi_theta/sexual-assault-victims-support-sexual-assault-victims-fundraiser

Thanksgiving at the Salvation Army

This past Tuesday, just two days before the Thanksgiving holiday, Delta Chi Theta’s Royal Neighbors of America chapter volunteered to help out and serve the residents at the Salvation Army’s homeless shelter. Mylaun Griffith, regular volunteer for the shelter, and Amie Badgett had set up the event for us. Along with helping prepare the meal and decorating the room to be more fall-festive, we got to hangout and talk with many of the resimg_0267-1idents which is what I personally find extremely rewarding. It reminds you that homeless people really are just like you and are all not too different from your friends. They just have had a different and possibly more difficult path.

Some of the homeless people can still enjoy themselves and can find joy in their lives even during hard times. This really makes you appreciate what you have in life. Even during the hard times, we have blessings that others may not have which we often take for granted.

This Thanksgiving, do not take anything for granted but have thanks for the things you do have and serve those who do not have. I cannot wait to be back at the shelter to volunteer!

If you want to get involved with the Salvation Army in the Quad Cities or have any questions about volunteering, please call Sarah Hite at 563-324-4808 or email her at sarah_hite@usc.salvationarmy.org
-You can also sign up to ring bells to raise money at http://www.ringbells.org this holiday season!

Written by Elise Cather
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